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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
venue. the queen mary, of course. [laughter] let's begin. it's dawn on inauguration day in washington d.c. a huge amount of people gathered on the washington mall. 2009 it was all away from the capital of a way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. there we go. and they are there, of course, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot
's begin. it's dawn on inauguration day in washington, d.c. to be a huge amount of people gather on the washington mall. in 2009 was all the way from the capitol all the way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. there we go. and there of course for the inauguration. people gather to watch and other places as well. in a times square in new york city and in classrooms around the country in paris and iraq, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also
in the reason was because declining enthusiasm. so there's not a republican in washington who describe themselves as a moderate or liberal, but the third of republicans in the country do. >> just to allays this point, rahm emanuel i say the republican party steeply provided to turn this small government land and no government land. there is a truth that not far. i am told we are now at our time. i want mickey to come back with a few closing comments. a part of this but that hasn't gotten as much attention in season mention that i like the bromides we should ignore chapter, which i would reach of the political system will collect no, no. third party to the, no. budget amendment say no. term limits they say no and public financing of elections no. but then i have a whole bunch of things they say yes to and i propose we have an election between the shadow congress and the current congress and then we can see who wins. so let me invite everybody to do closing comments. >> just going down a couple of these. does this represent the republican party as a whole. as citizens just said no, but i
associate dean for public interest and public service law at the george washington university school of law. he is responsible for creating pro bono opportunities for students, bringing a wide range of public interest programs to the law school, encouraging students to seek positions in the nonprofit and government sectors, and assisting students to find ways to fund legal education to make it possible for them to pursue careers outside of traditional law firms. most of his career, deena morrison work for the public citizen litigation group, which she cofounded with ralph nader in 1972, and directed for over 25 years. his work included open government, opening up the legal profession, suing agencies that failed to apply comply with the law, protecting the rights of consumers, and protecting unrepresented class members in class action settlements. he has argued 20 cases in the supreme court, including victories in the virginia state board of pharmacy, virginia citizens consumer council, making it subject to the first amendment. and striking out over 200 federal laws containing the legislativ
'm a small business owner from washington state, and this campaign does not have our best interests at heart. we need to fix the economy before the debt, you know, because i need customers. i don't need corporate -- [inaudible] trying to steal my medicare money. >> all right. i look forward to visiting afterwards for all of our ohio constituents who are here. where was i? so, thank you. but i do appreciate the opportunity to talk for a moment about tax reform -- >> senator portman, i'd like to make it clear that senior citizens are not -- [inaudible] we cannot -- [inaudible] >> um, as you can see, there's a lot of strong opinions on how we deal with our record deficits and debts, but i think everybody here and certainly the folks i talk to back home agree we have to. and these decisions won't be easy. as maya said, the political process is such that it's controversial, and we're going to hear plenty of opinions, it sounds like, from our panelists just as we have from the audience. >> i want to know what you're going to do to make sure the middle class -- >> let him speak! >> boo! >> middle c
a year ago. construction began in september. >> thank you, jack. george washington was supposed to have said that the most important inauguration was not the first one but the second want to see if we could reaffirm or transfer powers. whether we are republicans or democrats come we are looking forward to this. >> can we have mr. kerry did say something? >> thank you, senator. i am grateful to be here on behalf of the presidential inaugural committee. the partnership we have formed has been terrific and is integral to making sure that the events that we do here and throughout the capital this weekend is functioning in this great moment in our democracy. we are thrilled to have such great partners. they are waiting to help us execute with what the president and vice president want to see. we are grateful to have such strong partners. >> okay, ma'am? >> if you could let us know, this is paid for with housing and senate money, it will cost about 1,200,000 total, which is less than last year. we are coming in under budget, even though it will hold as many peeps best people. >> [inaudible qu
, and sort of a story that had gotten lost in all the politics in washington. >> host: well, bob, we have to comment as an employee of usa today, comment on usa tomorrow. >> guest: and the day after. i should thank sarah for the plug for that. what we did, the newspaper is, i think, in september was 30 years old so a a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like in 30 years from now, which would be, what are we talking about? 2042. you're better at math than i am. i -- anyway, they made predictions, and they talked about what it means for their industries, and we put out a little tab, and now that tab, tab or little sheet, is now an e-book, which i think you can buy for the grand total of $1.99 or $2.99. they have not really taken off yet. these short form, somewhere in between a book and a amazing, byliner does a lot of good ones, and amazon has been doing them. they can be posted almost immediately, and they sell for -- $2 or $4, maybe more. a few made the best seller list. some have been fiction. amy tan wrote a story called "too lo
and the antiscientist left and as he said my name is alex and i got my ph.d. in microbiology from washington, and more importantly now the editor of nuclear science.com. so, just a little bit about my background entirely microbiology. in fact that's me. a friend of mine had become an ob/gyn so i look like a geek in that picture so i put there. that's me working in the chamber which you may have come across at one point. uigur left with extremely slowly bacteria. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and i got my ph.d. in 2010 and then i immediately became an editor of science and i was in the real world for two years. so, my personal science philosophy is rather straightforward and simple. if you're not an expert it is best to accept the mainstream science. it should always come before politics. and that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. so, in view of a plea for teen science i don't country talk playing for the team right or blue but for science and i think we should always try to purge antiscientific thinking even if it comes from our friends and political allies
them a round of applause, thank you also much for coming. [applause] >> when you think of washington in 1835, 25 years before the civil war, you know, you would think well, slavery was well entrenched, you know, the black people were mr. boll, the waves were cruel and indifferent and that's actually not true at all. in washington, washington had 30,000 people done as a cd. 12,000 were black. the majority of black people in washington in 1830 were free, were not slaves out of the 12 s. and black people, slightly more than half were free. >> up next on booktv, "after
deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year including the conventions so we're very excited to bring the sensitive conversations about the issues driving washington thanks to the bank of america. thank you to your colleagues. you may have
adjourned >> "washington journal" starts at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> you do not always find many newspaper editors embracing this type of reporting. it's not just economics. it is the discomfort that investigative reporting causes in the newsroom. it is about more than economics. it's those people running into complaints of the publisher. and their stories are common over the years. people who are working for the strong upright in that area. >> the pulitzer prize-winning team will take your calls and e-mails and tweets next month on the in depth. they began their collaborative work in the 70s with the co-authors of eight books. the latest, the betrayal of the american dream. watch live at noon eastern on january 6 on c-span2. from the texas book festival american tapestry. the story of the background of michele obama. this is about 45 minutes. >> good evening. welcome. it is a delight to have you here, rachel, and to have all of you here. it's a lovely summer evening, and it is getting hot out there. summer will
the party line seemed to be more stark and obvious than they were then some of my early days in washington. we have four experts who will discuss the developments and essentially the filibuster. it has to do with senate procedure and presidents and senate rules and senate precedents on the other. you're going to hear from for individuals with a depth of experience in these matters. let me introduce everyone. in no particular border, we have james wallner from guesswork for the house and the senate and he currently serves as executive director and an adjunct professor in the congressional and presidential studies program he has a masters and phd in politics. james is a very astute observer in this senate. i can tell you from first-hand experience. the second speaker will be norman ornstein. he is a long-term observer of politics and he is an analyst at cbs news. he is the author of several books, which you may have read. the broken branch, how congress is failing america, and the permanent campaign of the future, and most recently, it's even worse than it looks, the new politics of extremis
] a fabulous researcher at "the washington post" and gabriel banks. eventually i found her and i can tell all that story because not because of the book but because of she had an abusive ex-husband eventually i found an article in "the new york times" about a lot of connections. obama writes about a new girlfriend. he is going up to her family's estate. this wealthy area in connecticut. >> host: at columbia university, a classmate of the president, to be honest, he had never had many black friends, he said. i saw that switch happened most markedly during the period that i was most close to him. barack obama was the most liberal person i ever met in terms of instructing his own identity. his achievement was really an achievement in the modern world. >> guest: beenu mahmood was one of a group of pakistani friends that barack obama had. they shared with him the he was comfortable that these guys. at columbia law school, they were very good guys. it is true that obama did his best. when i interview president obama in the oval office, he talked about the supporters in new york. but he started to m
of the founders of this institution the administration of washington was using the recession and the ongoing depression as the pretext to turn the american public against a free enterprise system and was doing so with the tools of class warfare half. this sounds remarkably similar to today and was the belief of our founders that unless something changed, something big was going to happen and something bad, the american economy and indeed to the american society. as we all know, something was about to happen in 1938 and we certainly hope something like that isn't about to happen today. we will get a view of tonight's speaker about what the next great revolution will look like in american politics. jim as i said is the president of the science foundation and he's written and edited books for many years on policy and politics. he's been a leading voice in the conservative intellectual movement and a central figure in before lamb preppie in higher education. we are honored to have him here. jim piereson. [applause] >> thanks very much, arthur. it's a great pleasure to be back at aei to renew a f
, washington, he got a job selling furniture in honolulu. he was always looking over the next thing. moving west. he moved from kansas, california, spent time and seattle, seattle to hawaii. so she came along as a family. she was only 17 when she graduated from high school, and excellent public school in suburban seattle. her name is stanley and. his name was stanley. barack obama had been there since 1969. also an undergraduate even though he was much older. and they both happen to sign up for a beginning russian class. this was during right after sputnik and the schools all of the country are starting to teach russian. it was the most important thing public schools could do, prepare the u.s. for the cold war. so they both ended up in a russian class and that's what the met. >> host: how long do they know each other before they got married? >> guest: they knew each other for five months. they met in september. they got married in february. she got pregnant before that. so it was, everything about it was, you know, it was not a normal courtship, normal, let me put it that way than what what
place for those revolutionaries. washington was in town, lafayette, and benjamin franklin. and so on this and the yearly 19th century albany became terminus with the erie canal. we were the end of the river they could not go any further than the rocky bottom shallows. it is where he dropped anchor and turned out to be albany. it is all of the great eastern cities all of the european immigration. the dutch, english, germans, iri sh, payments -- they came in in fantastic numbers into york, philadelphia, boston. and albany. they had so many irish they could not handle it during the famine and closed the borders and would not let any more people come to the city. eventually the irish became dominant in 19th century. in the 1875 census one 1/6 albanians was born in ireland. add to the politics that it was always a political city with dutch colonization. likewise with the drafters of the constitution gathering. it went it that way through the years. one of the great politicians of all time was the mayor of albany. from the time he was elected until he died in a hospital in 1983. "the on
plus, your e-mails, phone calls and tweets. washington journal, live tuesday, at 7:00 a.m. eastern, on c-span. >> now, latinos and the 2012 election, and what policy issues influenced their vote. speakers included former white house adviser to latin american, soto, and alfonso aguilar.: this is about two hours. [inaudible conversations] s. >> this is i think, as you all know, a place where public policy and research meet. i bring together the world of ideas with the world of policy action. very happy that tim johnson, the director of the latin american program is here this morning. and also want to acknowledge sal low star who had a lot to do with the planning, and this is an event we're cosponsoring with immigration works, to tamar a jacoby, and arizona state university, working on the issues. i want to acknowledge cardenas, a former governor and distinguished mexican colleague and many other good friends. and mane others back at the woodrow wilson system. and dan, who is out of government and into this civilian life. there's no doubt the latino vote was important in this past ele
marketplace mentioned the best of lists are coming out by publications "washington post," the economist, et cetera have been abrogated at booktv.org. you'll be able to see a lot of the best of 2012 books list. they are under our section called news about books. pulitzers this year, stephen greenblatt won for general nonfiction this word history delete many maribel, one for malcolm x and biography or autobiography. john lewis gaddis, george f. kennan and american life. what is this word about? >> guest: to swerve if i remember right, i admit i dipped into the book when it came out. it's fascinating. it was a little on the side of being i don't want to say -- intellectual. i don't mean to say that dismissively. that is about a palm. help me here. do you remember the name of the palm? we are funky and this exam here. rediscovered in the renaissance and then it changed the way it was published i guess you would say. printed or something. >> host: i didn't mean to but she was the spot there. >> guest: the cultures where did that and put in more modern take on life and the fear of dying is to put
us for the $100 trillion debt. you can't blame us for every problem emulating out of washington, d.c. we pointed out the disasters what i said in the book is just look at california. i said it four years ago. california is greece. it will go bankrupt. it's done. stick a fork in it. it and it came true. why? obama is practicing the california model for the entire nation. and that's what is happening to the country and that's why there are no jobs because in the end, my father, the butcher, had it right. my father the blue collar butcher said, son, ill through hate rich people. nobody poor has ever given me a job. it if you demonize and target and hunt and punish rich people all day they're going go on strike. they're not going create jobs they're not going to make you money, or pay you taxes they leave the country. who left the country this week after i've been saying. denise rich, the biggest democratic contributor in the country. she's now an us a free began citizens who left the country a month ago. the guy who cofounded facebook who left the country with the billions of dollars
-2006, a native american in the state of washington, playing basketball, hit his whip on the basketball hoop and was affected with the flesh eating bacteria and if you go online uconn google her name or his name, they have pictures of him in the throes of this malady. he survived. his surgeons were miraculously in the way they could graft skin to cover what was eaten by the bacteria and they attribute his survival, is curator intercession. that was verified. they have a battery of physicians to verify that these are super -- paranormal whatever occurrences that could only come from above and they verified that and the process is still somewhat slow. thatas 2005 or 2006. they decided to canonize her last year, december of 2011. they put it forward on october 21st, 2012. and novelized biography is something where you take the facts and try to tell stories, and you try to get the psychology we can respect because we are alive and people we have known, and we know our own inner heart and try to make it real in a way that is sympathetic. i don't mean soft, i mean sympathetic as in that is true in
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)